What are you reading?

RedNether

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Superman Smashes the Klan, a phenomenal story that follows in the footsteps of Morrison (and Waid in Birthright) in restoring Superman back to his proper characterization after the godawful John Byrne/Bryan Michael Bendis dull Superman characterizations.
 

Rebel Dynasty

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ShannonRohrer1
Listening to the audiobook of:


The story is...okay? I find the narrative style (not the narration, but the syntax itself) to be a bit clunky or overly expository at times. I also feel like all of the characters I've come across so far have come from the Crime Thriller Checklist™. The narrator herself has a wonderful voice, but considering the story is meant to take place in Boston, having a British narrator just seems a weird choice. How am I supposed to really get the feeling this is in Boston when some of the "rougher" characters come out cockney? :cautious:
 

V's patron

I have no name for I am but 2 days old ;).
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"Motherless Brooklyn" by Jonathan Lethem. It centers on Lionel Essrog a young man looking to find out who killed his mentor/father figure, Frank Minna. The big hook is he has Tourette's syndrome and has numerous tics or habits he has to indulge in. The book is told mostly from his point of view as he works the case. Edward Norton is adapting the film and made the decision to move the setting from the 1990s to the 1950s. He noted that everybody has an anachronistic feel to them, calling this take on Brooklyn a time capsule that never moved on which is something the book actually acknowledged. Because it's told from Lionel's perspective it becomes more about his inner struggles on how to live life without Frank's guidance. That forces him to confront several misconceptions he had about Frank and how he was raised so I'm curious how the movie handles it.

"Doctor Sleep" by Steven King. It's the sequel to the Shining (1977) and focuses on an adult Dan Torrance. He became an alcoholic to deal with the trauma of the first book and to suppress his psychic abilities. Eventually, he hits rock bottom and decides to build back his life. He joins AA and becomes an orderly at a hospice, eventually using his powers to help people pass on (hence the title). The core plot centers on Dan mentoring a young girl with similar powers named Abra. In turn, she is hunted by the True Knot a group of psychic vampires (this sounds scarier than I make it sound). Dan, Abra and the True knot are all introduced separately which creates suspense as to how all three are gonna crash into each other. It's a good read but it can drag in the first 200 pages.

"The Sandman universe presents Hellblazer" is a one-shot comic reintroducing John Constantine to the Sandman Universe. It's written by Si Spurrier a veteran Hellblazer scribe and also worked on The Dreaming. The Dreaming waxes on about the nature of storytelling and this issue is a take on the nature of reboots.

"A basketful of heads" centers on June Branch a woman with a mystical Norse ax that seeks to avenge someone close to her. The first works as an inciting incident showing us June before she got the ax.
 

Rebel Dynasty

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Really enjoying it so far. I actually read part of the story online a year ago, I think. The prose is solid, the magic system is interesting, and it's actually a pretty short read. My only complaint is that there are no scene breaks for the last half of the book, but that's mostly because finding time to just sit down and read lately hasn't exactly been in abundance.
 
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